Walk-Ups and Walk-Downs

A very common trope in rock, country, and folk music involves walking bass lines that "connect" one chord to another. I've used this in many of my song lessons, and I'm happy to share this list of related lessons if you'd like to brush up on this technique.


👋 This course is under construction! I'll be adding some new lessons, removing some old ones, and otherwise cleaning it up over the next few weeks. But in the meantime, feel free to browse all my existing lessons on this topic, which are all listed below. Enjoy!

How Do Walk-Ups & Walk-Downs Work?

If you've ever been curious where the notes (used in walking bass lines) come from, this series of videos may help. I answer some audience questions on this topic, and explain (using fretboard maps, and the same example in 4-5 common major keys) to show what all walk-ups and walk-downs have in common.


Strummy Walk-Downs

Sometimes we'll want to add strumming in between our walking-down bass notes, which is a great way to flesh out a descending bassline. Here's a few lessons explaining this technique in different contexts.


Exercises to Practice Walk-Ups & Walk-Downs

Here's some extended riffs you can practice, each of which features the walk-up and walk-down techniques covered in this course. Video lessons and print-friendly PDFs (with tabs) are available for each exercise below.


Songs with Walk-Ups and Walk-Downs

Of the many songs I've taught, here's a few favorites that make heavy use of walking bass lines (usually played between chords).